RN31 - Ethnic Relations, Racism and Antisemitism

Chair:

Ben Gidley, COMPAS, University of Oxford, United Kingdom, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Vice-Chair:

Kim Stoller, International Institute for Education and Research on Antisemitism,  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Board members:

Alfredo Allieti
Veronique Altglas
Sina Arnold
Christine Achinger
Alejandro Baer
Robert Fine
Achilleas Fotakis
David Hirsh
Christos Pallas
Karin Stoegner
Claudine Attias-Donfut
Robin Kim Stoller

Click here to read the biennial report 2013-2015 of RN31 

Click here to read the biennial report 2011-2013 of RN31

Click here to read the biennial report 2009-2011 of RN31


CALL FOR PAPERS

European Sociological Association

‘Refugees and migration - nationalist/racist responses’

RN31 Ethnic Relations, Racism and Antisemitism

Mid-term conference 

Early deadline for submitting abstracts: 1 May 2016

Extended deadline: 1 June 2016

1-2 September 2016

University of Warsaw
 

The ESA Research Network 31: Ethnic Relations, Racism and Antisemitism invites submissions of papers for its two yearly mid-term conference. The conference will be held from 1 to 2 September 2016 at the University of Warsaw.

We will hold sessions that focus on various practical, theoretical and methodological aspects of research on antisemitism and racism, also in a comparative framework. The conference aims to bridge a divide between the understanding of antisemitism and of racism, while exploring correspondences and affinities, but also differences and contrasts.

Besides papers on general theoretical approaches to antisemitism, racism and ethnic relations, we are interested both in nationalist / racist and in cosmopolitan / humanitarian responses to migration in general and the current refugee crisis.

Our special concern lies in (but is not limited to) the following issues and questions:

  • Theoretical approaches to the actuality of antisemitism, Islamophobia and racisms as a part of nationalist reactions towards migrants.
  • What is the meaning of the concept of defending “fortress Europe” in current European discourse? Which actors refer to “defending Europe” and how is this reflected in everyday language?
  • Nationalist framing of “violence” as “defense”.
  • How do postcolonial and cosmopolitan theoriesframe recent migration phenomena to and around the European Union? How do we define “migration” in the era of refugee crisis?
  • What is the role of previous generations of migrants in framing discourses? How (if at all) does the presence of previous generations of migrants in countries influence civic responses and political initiatives concerning refugees as well as their social support?
  • Events in the years 2015 & 2016 in chosen European countries in sociological perspective,
  • What challenges do the recent migrations pose to the discourses on European identity?
  • What responses to the situation of refugees are being delivered in the context of a crisis of EU values?
  • Differences between “migrants” and “refugees”, the nature of the nationalist and racist attacks on both groups, anti-multicultural discourses in Europe. Can we use the concept/label of “economically motivated migration” as a tool of questioning the credibility of migrants and refugees?
  • What are the material conditions and the social, political and historical contexts shaping variations in antisemitism and racism, across time and across different European and global contexts?
  • What is the role of relationships between antisemitism, racism and xenophobia in the actualization/revision of nationalist ideologies?
  • The current refugee crisis in Europe in the face of ethnic relations and the traditions of xenophobia in different countries - xenophobia and Islamophobia seen as two different, but in many respects intertwined sociological attitudes
  • Reconsideration of practices of »multiculturalism«; recurrence of the socio-political approaches of »integration« and »assimilation«
  • What challenges to research do the new practices of multiculturalism and anti-multiculturalism pose?
  • Rebirth of nationalist movements and ideologies in Western and Central-Eastern Europe: current trends, similarities and differences, different intellectual traditions of nationalist movements, different national variations of nationalist ideologies, attitudes towards migrants, refugees, strangers
  • Antisemitism as a matrix structure for nationalist xenophobic attitudes towards strangers in Europe
  • Different manifestations of racism, revisions of nationalism and the (European) left and right
  • How is colonial racism reflected in the attitudes towards migrants?
  • Gendered dimensions of migrations today
  • Anti-Roma attitudes, Roma inclusion and exclusion, and national and local strategies for addressing these

During the sessions, each speaker will have 20 minutes. All presentations will be made in English. 

Please send an abstract including institutional affiliation to the local committee of the mid-term conference throughthe form on the conference website: esa-refugees2016-rn31.eu or directly to the e-mail address: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

Early deadline for submitting abstracts: 1 May 2016

Extended deadline: 1 June 2016

This conference is generously supported by the Institute of Sociology, University of Warsaw, and by the European Sociological Association. 

 


 

 

ESA 2015 - Call for Papers

Differences, Inequalities and the Sociological Imagination
12th Conference of the European Sociological Association
Prague, Czech Republic, 25 – 28 August 2015

RN31 - Ethnic Relations, Racism and Antisemitism

RN Coordinator: Ben Gidley, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK, Ben.gidley(at)compas.ox.ac.uk

 

The 12th Conference of the European Sociological Association will be held in Prague 24-26 August 2015. The ESA Research Network 31 on Ethnic Relations, Racism and Antisemitism invites submissions of papers. We will hold sessions that focus on theoretical, methodological and empirical aspects of research on racism and antisemitism, especially in a comparative framework. The network’s perspective is to bridge the divide between the understanding of antisemitism and of racism, and to explore the correspondences, contiguities and contrasts across this divide. Our over-arching question is to understand what are the social, political and intellectual conditions that shape variations in antisemitism, racism and other forms of intolerance across time and across different European and global contexts. In 2015, we particularly want to focus on the relationship between antisemitism and racism as ideology and as social practice, including how they are deployed in legal contexts, everyday speech acts and political discourses.

1. General session

The general theme of the ESA conference as a whole is Differences, Inequalities and the Sociological Imagination in a context of globalisation, and we particularly invite papers that address this theme. We propose general sessions which will address the theme in the following way.

  • Inequalities: Globalisation has driven rising inequalities, within and between societies; lines of “race” and the walls erected between citizens and non-citizens have been central to entrenching old inequalities and generating new ones – for instance helping to structure access to ecological resources, health, human security and the right to the city. How can we address this empirically and theoretically? How do - against the background of a system of competing nation states - social changes and deepening inequalities relate to the mobilisation of racism, xenophobia and antisemitism, including those expressed in radical, far right and populist social movements? Although it is contested as to whether inequality helps drive racism, it is clear that racism drives new forms of inequality, but these need to be understood intersectionally, in interaction with factors such as socioeconomic, educational, geographical, age and generation inequality.
     
  • Differences: Racism and ethnic relations structure difference, and intersect with other forms of difference. How can we understand racism and ethnic relations intersectionally? How do new and old forms of difference relate to each other and to new and old forms of intolerance? How are figures such as the Jew, the stranger, the Muslim, the Gypsy and the migrant positioned in the economy of differences of Europe today?
     
  • The sociological imagination: Classic theories of racism and antisemitism remain a vital resource for understanding differences and inequalities today, but the mutation of racism requires a renewal of the sociological imagination. What epistemological and methodological challenges are posed by transforming racism, and how can we meet these challenges? What can sociology contribute to and learn from other disciplines, and especially critical theory and history, in the analysis of racism and antisemitism? How can we shape a more cosmopolitan sociological imagination? How has social science itself contributed to or failed to reckon with racisms and antisemitism?

In the context of this larger conference we welcome a wide variety of papers concerning ethnic relations, racism and antisemitism. We particularly encourage:

  • papers that respond to contemporary issues faced in civil society in Europe and particularly in the Czech Republic and central Europe;
  • papers that concern the hallmark of the sociological imagination: the translation between private troubles and public issues – specifically, papers that contribute to anti-racist strategies or to resources for confronting racism and antisemitism in the public sphere, in social movements and in academia itself;
  • papers that contribute to a European sociology of racisms: that is, to an understanding that exceeds methodological and conceptual nationalism, enables a comparative focus across European contexts, and captures the specificity of European forms and traditions of racism;
  • papers that contribute to the development of more robust methodological tools for measuring and analysing antisemitism and racism in this comparative context.


2. Specific session: Black Europe: Other Cosmopolitanisms

The cosmopolitanism of ‘cosmopolitan Europe’ has tended to derive from the Western European tradition where (national) differences are acknowledged within a common (European) cultural framework. At the same time, a particular understanding of (European) ‘universality’ is posited against those (non-European) ‘others’ who are more often associated with a diversity that constitutes ‘multiculturalism’. However, this is only possible to the extent that it rests on a particular understanding of European history, one that evades acknowledging European domination over much of the world as significant to that history and one that also understands ‘being European’ and ‘being white’ as synonymous. In the process, longer histories of connection and entanglement that have created multicultural societies are disavowed. How, precisely, differences are understood and recognized as cosmopolitan differences or multicultural differences is not clear, except insofar as they map onto some notion of visible, that is, racialized – or, then, more recently, religious – difference. This session recognises the long-standing historical presence of Black Europeans and Black Europe and seeks to draw attention to these absent histories within dominant social science conceptions of ‘cosmopolitan Europe’. In the process, it also seeks to broaden and reconceptualise existing understandings of European cosmopolitanism and the sociological imagination that is informed by these understandings.

 

3. Specific session: Changing dynamics of difference

This session will reflect on shifting meanings, boundaries and consequences of difference. Papers will explore how the interplay between the production of racialised difference and the management of difference via policy and practice has changed over time and how this relates to the changing patterning of social and economic inequalities. In particular, we welcome papers that situate discussion in local, national and regional political, economic and social contexts and form connections between the historical and the contemporary. Papers might speak from the perspective of policy production or the lived experience of racialised difference, or focus on anti-racist responses and challenges to the former.

 

4. Joint session with RN28 Sociology of Sport. Joint session title: Racial/ethnic relations and Sport

Sport is often described as a field of equality and social inclusion. But the analysis of social relationships in the context of sport (including professional, student and leisure sports) reveals processes of racial/ethnic stigmatization, distinction, discrimination, segregation and labelling. Sport has also been a platform for the expression of racial/ethnic identities and for the mobilisation of both racist and anti-racist politics. Therefore, this session’s aim is to explore such processes and to adopt a perspective situated at the intersection of the sociology of sport and the sociology of racial/ethnic relations.

In order to contribute to the analysis of these processes and to open new horizons for further investigation, we invite papers aimed both at understanding the relationships between sport and race/ethnicity, and at using sport as a tool for the analysis of social relationships, social identities and social trajectories.

The session is open to researchers using all methodologies, both quantitative and qualitative. A focus on racial or ethnic difference would also be welcome in intersection with other dimensions such as gender or social class.

 

5. Joint session with RN28 Sociology of Sport and RN 32 Political Sociology. Joint session title: Sport, ethnicity and political conflict

There has been a growing interest in the role of sport both in underpinning ethnic belongings and exacerbating interethnic tensions, on the one hand, and in promoting positive interaction and conflict resolution, on the other. The proposed session will explore these phenomena along a range of dimensions including:

  • The historical sociology of ethnic conflict, nationalism and sport
  • The comparative analysis of ethnic conflict, nationalism and sport
  • The historical sociology of ethnic/national conflict resolution
  • The comparative analysis of ethnic conflict/national conflict resolution

We welcome contributions that develop these ideas theoretically and/or empirically. New styles of analysis would be desirable, including visual approaches and new forms of textual analysis.

Notes for authors

Authors are invited to submit their abstract either to the general session or any specific session. Please submit only to one session. After abstract evaluation, coordinators will have the chance to transfer papers between sessions where applicable.

Abstracts should not exceed 250 words. Each paper session will have the duration of 1.5 hours. Normally sessions will include 4 papers.

Abstracts must be submitted online to the submission platform, see below. Abstracts sent by email cannot be accepted. Abstracts will be peer-reviewed and selected for presentation by the Research Network; the letter of notification will be sent by the conference software system in early April 2015.

Abstract submission deadline: 15th February 2015

Abstract submission platform: www.esa12thconference.eu 

If you have further questions on the conference, please visit the conference website. For further information on the Research Network, please visit www.europeansociology.org.

 


 

European Sociological Association, RN 31 Ethnic Relations, Racism and Antisemitism

Mid-Term Conference

Contemporary Antisemitism and Racism in the Shadow of the Holocaust

Vienna, 4-6 September 2014

Department of Art History, Campus Hof 9, Spitalgasse 2, 1090 Vienna

 Download the Conference Programme in PDF!

 

Thursday, 4 September

9:00-9:30

Registration

9:30-10:00

Welcome by the Vice-rector of the University of Vienna

 

Session 1 – Racism and Antisemitism

Session 2 – Holocaust Remembrance I

10:00-10:30

Ben Gidley (Oxford University)

I’m not racist but some of my best friends are: structures of disavowal in contemporary racism

Claudine Attias-Donfut (CNRS France)

The Ageing of Jewish Nazi Victims

10:30-11:00

Susie Jacobs (Manchester Metropolitan University)

Ambiguous classifications: racisms, ‘whiteness’ and antisemitism

IreneuszKrzeminski (Warsaw University)

Have only Jews suffered? Holocaust remembrance and Polish national identity

11:00-11:30

Tobias Neuburger (University of Innsbruck)

“Voller List und Ränke”. On the Relation of Anti-Gypsyism and Anti-Semitism

Karen Frostig (Brandeis University & Lesley University)

Remembering Memory in Vienna 

11:30-12:00

Coffee Break 

 

Session 3 -  Holocaust Remembrance and Education

Session 4 – Racism and Anti-Muslim Resentment

12:00-12:30

ElkeRajal (Institute of Conflict Research, Vienna)

Holocaust Education in Austria

Monica Massari (University of Naples “Federico II”)

Muslim Women in Europe in the Shadow of Islamophobia and Post-Colonial Past

12:30-13:00

EsraOzyurek (London School of Economics)

Making Germans out of Muslims? Immigrant only Holocaust Education and Anti-Semitism Prevention Trainings

Christa Markom (University of Vienna)

Racism as Group Phenomenon in Austria

13:00-13:30

KerenBabtzuck-Harazi (University of Haifa)

“Present in the Collective, Yet Absent from Memory?” The Holocaust Survivors of Greece in Isreali Collective Memory

ZbynekTarant (University of West Bohemia, Pilsen)

“The Enemy of My Enemy is My … Enemy?” – Neo-Nazis and Muslims in Czech Republic 

13:30-14:30

Lunch Break 

 

Session 5 – Conceptual Approaches I: Badiou, Butler, and New Antisemitism

Session 6 – South and Central Europe

14:30-15:00

David Seymour (City University London)

Adorno contra Badiou: The Holocaust, the Jews and Antisemitism

GüntherJikeli (Indiana University)

Edorgan’sAntisemitic Obsession

15:00-15:30

NicoBechter (University of Vienna)

Badiou, Antisemitism and the Case of Wagner

Michal Navoth (attorney)

Antisemitism in Greece, June 2012-May2014: The Worrisome Surge of the Golden Dawn

15:30-16:00

David Hirsh (Goldsmith College London)

Hostility to the EUMC Working Definition of Antisemitism: The Exclusion of Zionists from the Community of the Progressive and the Whitening of the Jews

IstvánPogány (University of Warwick)

Holocaust Remembrance and Antisemitism in Hungary

16:00-16:30

Holger Knothe (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München)

Odd couple or perfect match? On conceptualizing contemporary antisemitism

Michal Vasecka (Faculty of Social Sciences, Brno)

Does Antisemitism Influence the Process of Modernization in Central Europe after 1989? 

16:30-17:00

Coffee Break

  

 

Session 7 – Holocaust Denial

Session 8

17:00-17:30

Andreas Peham (Dokumentationsarchiv des österreichischen Widerstandes)

Antisemitism and Holocaust Denial in Austria

 

17:30-18:00

George Lekaditis (University of Haifa)

Holocaust Denial and the Holocaust Remembrance Day as Tools for a New Antisemitism

 

18:00-18:30

Gabriel Mayer (University of Haifa)

Holocaust Denial and Antisemitism: A Look at the Media

 

Friday, 5 September

 

Session 9 – Anti-Muslim Racism and Antisemitism

Session 10 – Anti-Zionism I

9:30-10:00

Carina Klammer (University of Vienna)

Anti-Muslim Racism, Antisemitism and the Discourse of “Competition of Victim Status”

LjiljanaRadonic (Austrian Academy of Sciences & University of Vienna)

From Feminist Antisemitism to Post-Feminist “Post-Zionism

10:00-10:30

Julia Edthofer (University of Vienna)

Debates on Israel in the Frame of Holocaust and Colonialism Remembrance

Eli Avraham (University of Haifa)

Fighting Antisemitism, Stereotypes and Media Bias: Media Strategies to Restore Israel Image Since 1948

10:30-11:00

Martin Meyrath (University of Vienna)

Islamophobic Racism and Antisemitism

Arieh J. Kochavi (University of Haifa)

Antisemitism, Holocaust Remembrance, and Criticism of Israel 

11:00-11:30

Coffee Break 

 

Session 11 – Holocaust Remembrance and Hatred of Israel

Session 12 -

11:30-12:00

Thorsten Fuchshuber (Université du Luxembourg)

Hatred of Civilization and “Critique” of Israel – Antisemitism as Collective Narcissism

Richard Albrecht (independent scholar)

The Turkish Genocide Against the Ottoman Armenians and its Place within the Political History of the 20th Century

12:00-12:30

NatanSznaider (Academic College of Tel-Aviv-Yaffo) and Alejandro Baer (University of Minnesota)

Global Holocaust Memory and the Politics of “Never Again”. The uses of “Jewish Uniqueness” and the “Genocide” paradigm

Alina Cala (Jewish Historical Institute, Warsaw)

Denying the Holocaust in Poland

12:30-13:00

Eveline Goodman-Thau (Hermann-Cohen-Akademie für Religion, Wissenschaft und Kunst, Buchen/Odenwald)

Antisemitism after Auschwitz. On the Politics of Myth, Memory and Messianism

Anya Topolski (KU Leuven – University of Leuven)

The “Judeo-Christian” Tradition: A Genealogy of Europe’s Exclusions 

13:00-14:00

Lunch Break 

 

Session 13 – Conceptual Approaches II: From Marx to Arendt

Session 14 – Antisemitism in Arab Countries

14:00-14:30

Chad Alan Goldberg (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Capitalism and the Jews: A Study in the Historical Sociology of Ideas

Esther Webman (Tel Aviv University)

Old and New in the Palestinian Holocaust Public Discourse

14:30-15:00

Robert Fine (University of Warwick)

Neither lack of love nor antizionism: Arendt’s Jewish Writings

Kim Robin Stoller (International Institute for Education and Research on Antisemitism & Free University of Berlin)

Antisemitism, anti-Zionism and Holocaust Perception in Marocco. Theoretical Reflections on Islamic, (pan-)national and Ethnic Collective Identity Constructions

15:00-15:30

Philip Spencer (Kingston University)

A path not taken: Marxism, cosmopolitanism and the question of antisemitism

David Patterson (The University of Texas at Dallas)

Islamic Jihadism and the Legacy of Nazi Antisemitism

15:30-16:00

Ilka Schroeder (Technical University Berlin)

The “Jew” as antithesis to the national principle?

Samuel Ghiles-Meilhac (Science-Po Paris)

The Debate on New Antisemitism in France: A War of the Jews? 

16:00-16:30

Coffee Break 

 

Session 15 – Holocaust Remembrance III

Session 16 – Antisemitism and Prejudice Research

16:30-17:00

Catherine Chatterley (University of Manitoba)

Fatigue, Envy, Politics: Holocaust Memorialization Through a DiasporicLense

BjörnMilbradt (University of Kassel)

The Development of Prejudice in Early Childhood – With Regard to its Embedment in Everyday nursery School Interactions

17:00-17:30

Lesley Klaff (Sheffield Hallam University)

Holocaust Inversion in Great Britain: Defining the Limits of Acceptable Political Discourse in Parliament

Mark Elchardus (Free University Brussels)

Racist attitudes and negative expectations

17:30-18:00

Sarah Cardaun (King’s College London)

Holocaust Commemoration in Britain between the Rhetoric of Fighting Antisemitism and Universalistic Practice

Michael Höttemann (University of Marburg)

Lay theories of Antisemitism. The contradictory consequences of understanding prejudice as a result of intentional behaviour 

Saturday, 6 September

 

Session 17 – Anti-Zionism II

Session 18 – Survivor Testimonies and Jewish Communities

9:30-10:00

Stephan Grigat (University of Vienna)

The Iranian Threat and the Delegitimization of Israel in Austria and Germany

KaisaKetokivi (University of Helsinki & New York University)

Jewish Identity, Belonging and Social Boundaries in a Progressive Brooklyn Neighbourhood

10:00-10:30

Andreas Benl (Mideast Freedom Forum Berlin)

Western Societies, Cultural Relativism, anti-Zionism and the Politics of History

Anna HolmlövSarri (University of Lund)

The story of a Third Generation Survivor

10:30-11:00

EirikEiglad (University of Oslo &Telemark University College)

The Promise of Anti-Zionism

Lars Dencik (University of Roskilde)

Perceptions of Antisemitism among Jews in Contemporary Europe 

11:00-11:30

Coffee Break

 

Session 19 – Conceptual Approaches III: Critical Theory

Session 20 – Historical Case Studies

11:30-12:00

Lars Rensmann (John Cabot University, Rome)

The Frankfurt School and Antisemitism Revisited: Toward Contemporary Theorizing of Judeophobia in Global Politics

Daniel Rickenbacher (University of Zurich)

The Third Position – Ahmed Huber’s Ideology of Antisemitism

12:00-12:30

Christine Achinger (University of Warwick)

Towards a critical theory of identity: Approaches to constructions of Jewishness and gender in Adorno, Butler and New Materialism

Nikolaus Hagen (University of Innsbruck)

Antisemitism and Nazi-Era Western -Austrian Cultural Policy

12:30-13:00

Karin Stögner (University of Vienna & Institute of Conflict Research Vienna)

The ideology of nature: Adorno and Horkheimer on antisemitism and sexism

Dario Padovan (University of Turin) & Alfredo Alietti (University of Ferrara)

Social Sciences and Racism: The Racialization of Sociological Discourse During the Fascist Period in Italy

13:00-13:30

Thomas Ogrisegg (University of Vienna)

Rationality and Irrationality of Antisemitism

Vanessa Rau (Humboldt University Berlin)

Radical Secularism as Antisemitism?

13:30-14:30

Lunch Break

 

 

14:30-15:30

Business meeting Research Network 31

 

 

 



CALL FOR PAPERS

EuropeanSociologicalAssociation

Contemporary antisemitism and racism in the shadow of the
Holocaust

RN31EthnicRelations,RacismandAntisemitism

Mid-termconference

Deadline for submitting abstracts: 22May 2014

4–5 September 2014

University of Vienna

 

The ESA Research Network 31: Ethnic Relations, Racism and Antisemitism invites submissions of papers for its biannual mid-term conference. The conference will be held from 4 to 5 September 2014 at the University of Vienna.

We will hold sessions that focus on theoretical, methodological and empirical aspects of research on antisemitism and racism, also in a comparative framework. The network’s perspective is to bridge an exclusive divide between the understanding of antisemitism and of racism, exploring the correspondences and affinities, but also the differences and contrasts. Our over-arching question is to understand what are the material conditions and the social, political and historical contexts shaping variations in antisemitism and racism, across time and across different European and global contexts.

Besides papers on general theoretical approaches to antisemitism, racism and ethnic relations, we are particularly interested in questions of contemporary antisemitism and how it relates to Holocaust remembrance and denial. Thus, papers on ‘secondary’ and ‘new antisemitism’ are expressly welcome. Our special concern lies in (but is not limited to) the following issues:

  • Theoretical/conceptual approaches to the actuality of antisemitism/racism.
  • How are antisemitism and Holocaust remembrance connected to each other?
  • What is the relationship between Holocaust remembrance/denial and ‘new’ antisemitism?
  • What is the role of right wing populism in the interconnection of antisemitism and Holocaust remembrance/denial?
  • How does Islamist antisemitism relate to contemporary antisemitism and Holocaust remembrance/denial?
  • Antisemitism, Holocaust remembrance/denial, the image of Israel and the (European) left.
  • Resentmentand prejudice against Muslimsin relation to antisemitism and Holocaust remembrance.
  • Relation of antisemitism, anti-Zionism and criticism of Israel.
  • How are antisemitism and Holocaust remembrance/denial involved in shaping new European identities?
  • How are antisemitism and Holocaust remembrance/denial related to European colonial racism and postcolonial remembrance?
  • How do all of these issues relate to nationalism?
  • What are the gendered dimensions of these issues?

During the sessions, each speaker will have 20 minutes. All presentations will be made in English. Please send an abstract including eventual institutional affiliation to the local committee of the mid-term conference: Karin Stoegner ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ) &NicoBechter ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

Deadline: 22 May 2014

This conference is sponsored by the Research Platform “Migration and Integration Research”, University of Vienna.

 

You are here: Home Research Networks RN31 - Ethnic Relations, Racism and Antisemitism